Barrel Plating Services

Zinc Electro Plating

Zinc Electro Plating

Zinc is one of numerous metals that can be used to electroplate a finished or nearly finished metal part.

Zinc-Nickel Plating

Zinc Nickel Plating

Zinc-nickel plating is rapidly becoming the “plating process of choice” for those who need their metal parts to have exceptionally strong resistance.

Post Treatment

Post Treatment

Electroplated parts often undergo more processing to further improve one or more characteristics of the parts, such as corrosion resistance, lubricity, ductility, torque uniformity, and identifiability.

Pickle & Oil

Pickle & Oil

Metals which have been mechanically altered and worked or formed into a useful product (such as a screw, bolt or other fitting) are often coated with a discolored oxidized layer or scale.

Zinc Electro Plating

Zinc is one of numerous metals that can be used to electroplate a finished or nearly finished metal part.  Zinc coating prevent oxidation by creating a sacrificial barrier between the metal part and the surrounding environment.  Also, a layer of zinc on the outside of a metal part provides protection against wear and abrasion.

The primary advantage of barrel zinc plating over zinc-nickel plating is cost.   Bottom line, the process of zinc electroplating is less costly than zinc-nickel electroplating, resulting in less expensive metal parts.

However, though barrel zinc electroplating does provide significant corrosion, wear and abrasion resistance, it does not provide the same level of resistance as does zinc-nickel plating.

Therefore, barrel zinc electroplating is typically the “process of choice” if you need a large quantity of parts barrel electroplated, where cost is an issue and longevity is not as important.  For example, parts used on the interior of a product or in-doors for other applications may not require the longevity that other parts might need.

To see a list of parts which are typically barrel zinc plated, go to our checklist by clicking this link Zinc Plating or Zinc-Nickel Plating: Which is Right for You?

Zinc-Nickel Plating

Zinc-nickel plating is rapidly becoming the “plating process of choice” for those who need their metal parts to have exceptionally strong resistance to corrosion, wear and abrasion and therefore last longer.  The addition of the nickel to create the zinc alloy acts to provide a strong barrier to the natural processes of rust, wear and damage.

While providing a more exceptional resistance to these processes than barrel zinc plating, zinc-nickel plating is more costly than zinc plating, approximately 2 ½ times more.

Therefore, you should carefully assess the application for the metal part you need to have electroplated.  A trade-off exists between the cost effective nature of a zinc plated part and the longevity and enhanced resistance of the zinc-nickel plated part.

We have created a checklist of items to consider when selected between barrel zinc plating and zinc-nickel plating.  Access this list by clicking on this link: Zinc Plating or Zinc-Nickel Plating: Which is Right for You?

We can also help you to understand whether barrel zinc plating or zinc-nickel plating would be best for you   Please contact us, and we will discuss your project and the best plating process for you.

Post-Treatment

Electroplated parts often undergo more processing to further improve one or more characteristics of the parts, such as corrosion resistance, lubricity, ductility, torque uniformity, and identifiability.

A brief review of each post-treatment is provided below.  Wolverine Plating Corporation can provide each of these post treatments to obtain the results you need from your metal part:

Hexavalent Chromates

These can be applied to electroplated parts after the plating process has been completed.  As a result, the corrosion, wear, and abrasion resistance of the part are dramatically improved.  These include clear, black, olive drab and yellow.

Trivalent Chromates

Same as hexavalent, except these “these coatings are ELV (end of life vehicles) and RoHS compliant.”

Baking for Hydrogen Embrittlement

Embrittlement, or loss of ductility or strength of a part, can be a cause of failure in hardened metal parts.  The electroplating process may induce hydrogen embrittlement.  To offset this, parts are subjected to a baking process that dramatically reduces the chance of hydrogen embrittlement.

Sealants

These can be applied after the plating process to improve the corrosion resistance of the part.

Waxes and Torque Tension Fluids

These can be applied after the plating process to improve lubricity and the uniformity of the torque.

Dyes

To improve the look of the part, dyes can be added.  Red, orange, black, yellow, green, blue and violet are commonly used.  These dyes can also be applied for identification purposes. FOR example green and red could identify a right side or left side part.

Don’t Know if Your Part Needs a Post-Treatment?

The experts at Wolverine Plating Corporation can help.  Please contact us to discuss your post-treatment needs and options.

Pickle & Oil

Metals that have been mechanically altered and worked or formed into a useful product (such as a screw, bolt or other fitting) are often coated with a discolored oxidized layer or scale.  Before any surface finishing process is performed, this scale must be removed.

To do so, the part is treated with an acidic solution that cleans the metal by removing inorganic contaminants that can not be removed by other solutions.

This process is commonly called acid pickling.

After pickling, the part is treated with an oil solution that improves the corrosion resistance of the part.

Once the combined “Pickle & Oil” processes have been applied, the part is then ready to be zinc plated or zinc-nickel plated in a barrel.

Have Questions About Pre-Treatments for your Metal Part?

The experts at Wolverine Plating Corporation can help.  Please contact us to discuss your pre-treatment needs and options.